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An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’: Story Of A Man Child Running From Responsibility

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’: Story Of A Man Child Running From Responsibility

The 2005 release that was termed ‘progressive’ when it hit the screens, this Saif Ali Khan and Preity Zinta starrer movie was anything but that. In fact, in simple words, one can call it a rather regressive film, one that ends up feeding into sexism and misogyny.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Ambar (Preity Zinta) is a radio jockey and Nick/Nikhil (Saif Ali Khan) is a renowned chef in Melbourne. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

From the first few minutes of the movie, the plot becomes rather obvious - a journey of two people who can’t stand each other to two people who can’t stay away from each other. But because this one was supposed to break stereotypes, a lot of progressive shit was forced into the script - like live-in relationships. But we’ll get to that in some time.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Nick, who from the get-go is shown as a typical irresponsible man-child, gets off the wrong foot with Ambar after having missed being on her show on time. They get to a horrible start, but bump into each other at a wedding where Ambar is a bridesmaid and Nick is catering.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Both their best friends (Cathy and Ron) fall in love with each other and meanwhile, Ambar and Nick start developing an equation of their own. The expected happens - love, and then as per the orthodox Indian audience, the unexpected happens as well - a live-in. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Ambar and Nick move in together and before we know it, Ambar is pregnant. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

One would call this the turning point in the movie. But in reality, it was a point when Nick’s inherent sexism  and ‘men will be men’ mentality hit the roof. Why? Because neither does he not want the child, but also feels absolutely zero emotional responsibility towards Ambar while she struggles with the dilemma of aborting the kid.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

I kid you not (pun not intended), there is one conversation in the film where Nick straight up suggests to ‘kill’ the baby growing inside of Ambar, only to be corrected by her who reminds him that the word is ‘abort’. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Most of Ambar’s pregnancy is spent struggling alone and the only other addition that Nick makes to it, besides his sperm, is to go for a blood test which too is apparently a big deal because the guy hates the sight of blood. Oh, the sacrifice!

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Sooner or later, Nick realises how the ‘N’ in his name might as well be replaced with a ‘D’, because that is exactly what he has been to Ambar. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

After almost half her pregnancy, he finally starts showing some effort...by getting her ice cream. The guy really was aiming for gold in being the best father-to-be. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

All this, only to be butt-hurt again when he sees her trying on rings with her friend Jignesh. And perhaps that is all it takes for Nick to go back to being his selfish, a**hole self as he oscillates back to his basic instinct of being a f**kboi. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

He brings back a woman named Stella home but doesn’t sleep with her. Ambar, obviously, assumes otherwise and gets mighty pissed.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

A lot of drama later, Ambar’s water breaks and the movie proceeds to a disappointing climax at the hospital. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

Stella is the nurse delivering Ambar’s baby, who also tells her how nothing happened between her and Nick (other than him chanting her name all night long), Ambar delivers twins and Nick proposes to her.

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

One would think that a woman who was independent, successful and educated would know better than to accept the proposal of a man-child who wasn’t just absent during one of the toughest times of her life but also very sexist, immature and flaky. 

An Honest Review Of ‘Salaam Namaste’ © Yash Raj Films

But, nope. She joyously accepts the proposal, glorifying the idea that despite men being total and utter d**ks to women, by literally getting them pregnant and abandoning them, all it takes for a woman to welcome them back is one half-hearted proposal. 

The End.